Sunday, 30 September 2012

1967, Music: Eurovision Song Contest

The twelfth Eurovision Song Contest was held on 8 April 1967 at the "Großer Festsaal der Wiener Hofburg", Vienna, Austria. Erika Vaal presented the festival and of the 17 participants Sandie Shaw won for the United Kingdom with "Puppet on a String". The song had one of the widest margins of victory ever witnessed in the competition; it garnered more than twice as many votes as the second place song. It was the first victory for the United Kingdom.
 
The entry from Luxembourg, "L'amour est bleu", sung by Vicky Leandros (fourth place), became the biggest international hit of the 1967 contest. Denmark did not participate and left the contest until 1978. Eduardo Nascimento, representing Portugal, was the first black male singer in the history of Eurovision Song Contest.


Draw
Country
Artist
Song
Place
Points
01
Netherlands
Thérèse Steinmetz
"Ring-dinge-ding"
14
2
02
Luxembourg
Vicky Leandros
"L'amour est bleu"
4
17
03
Austria
Peter Horton
"Warum es hunderttausend Sterne gibt"
14
2
04
France
Noëlle Cordier
"Il doit faire beau là-bas"
3
20
05
Portugal
Eduardo Nascimento
"O vento mudou"
12
3
06
Switzerland
Géraldine
"Quel cœur vas-tu briser?"
17
0
07
Sweden
Östen Warnerbring
"Som en dröm"
8
7
08
Finland
Fredi
"Varjoon - suojaan"
12
3
09
Germany
Inge Brück
"Anouschka"
8
7
10
Belgium
Louis Neefs
"Ik heb zorgen"
7
8
11
United Kingdom
Sandie Shaw
"Puppet on a String"
1
47
12
Spain
Raphael
"Hablemos del amor"
6
9
13
Norway
Kirsti Sparboe
"Dukkemann"
14
2
14
Monaco
Minouche Barelli
"Boum-Badaboum"
5
10
15
Yugoslavia
Lado Leskovar
"Vse rože sveta"
8
7
16
Italy
Claudio Villa
"Non andare più lontano"
11
4
17
Ireland
Sean Dunphy
"If I Could Choose"
2
22



Sandie Shaw: "Puppet on a String"

Wednesday, 26 September 2012

1966, Cars: Car of the Year, Renault 16

The Renault 16 won the Car of the year award in 1966 with 98 points. To replace a rear-drive car of limited success, the Frégate, Régie Nationale gave front wheel drive (with gearbox in front end, as in the R4) to its new top of range. The unusual design by Philippe and Gaston Juchet Charbonneaux, and very determining for looks, was the rear hatch access to load area. 5-door body, 4.23 m long. Independent suspension at 4 wheels. 4-speed manual or 3-speed auto transmission. OHV 4-cylinder 1.5 (55 hp) and 1.6 (83) engines. Second was the Rolls Royce Silver Shadow with 81 points and third the Oldsmobile Toronado with 59 points.
Renault 16 1965
Renault 16 range 1974
 Over 1,845,959 R16s were produced during a production which lasted for some 15 years. Series production started in March 1965 and lasted until 1980 when it was finally replaced by the less successful Renault 20. Even by this stage, when it was nearly 15 years old, the Renault 16 was still one of the most popular cars on sale in Europe. By the time the Renault 16 ceased production most other European manufacturers had at least one hatchback on sale. At the time Renault had six hatchbacks on sale, the R4, R5, R6, R14, R20 and R30.
Second Place Rolls Royce Silver Shadow
Third Place Oldsmobile Toronado
Renault 16, 1969 USA Advert


Renault 16 TS 1970s French Advert


Renault 16 TX 1970s French Advert


Renault 16 1975 French Advert
 

Monday, 24 September 2012

1965, News: The End for Oorderen

In 1965 Oorderen, a small Belgian village near the city of Antwerp was demolished because of the extension of the Port of Antwerp. The village, first mentioned in 1116, merged with the city of Antwerp in 1927. In its place came the General Motors factory aka as Opel Antwerp (closed on Friday 17 December 2010). On of the last buildings to be demolished was the church, on 24 October 1965 the church tower was pulled down. Oorderen disappeared with three other villages Wilmarsdonk, Oosterweel and Lillo.
 
 
 
Floating Bridge
View of the village
The "Zandstraat" (Sand Street)
The Town Hall ( in the back the Church with spire)
The Church (without the spire)
 
View on the dike
 
Demolition of the Church (1965)
The Church

A nostalgic report of the last wedding celebrated in the Town Hall and Church of Oorderen,
while the bulldozers already arrive to destroy. (BRT/VRT 1965)

Saturday, 22 September 2012

1964, Television: "Bewitched"

"Bewitched" premièred on September 17, 1964 on the American channel ABC. This situation comedy ran for eight seasons from 1964 to 1972, starring Elizabeth Montgomery, Dick York (1964–1969), Dick Sargent (1969–1972), Agnes Moorehead, and David White. The show tells the story of a beautiful witch who marries an ordinary man and tries to lead the life of a typical suburban housewife. A total of 254 were produced. In 1976, 4 years after Bewitched ended a spin-off was produced titled "Tabitha" with Lisa Hartman as Tabitha Stephens, the daughter of Samantha and Darrin.
Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha Stephens
 
Synopsis
The young advertisement agency executive, Darrin Stephens marries the beautiful Samantha Stephens. On their honeymoon, Sam tells Darrin that she is a witch with magic powers. He makes her promise that she will never use witchcraft or spells in the future. Later on Sam can't resist and she uses her magic to help Darrin and herself. Sam's mother, Endora does not accept her mortal son-in-law, hates him and can hardly say his name correctly. In the suburb where they live, their curious neighbour Gladys Kravitz suspects Samantha...
Agnes Moorehead as Endora, Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha Stephens and Dick York as Darrin Stephens
 
Main Cast
  • Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha Stephens
  • Dick York (1964–1969) as Darrin Stephens
  • Dick Sargent (1969–1972) as Darrin Stephens
  • Agnes Moorehead as Endora
  • David White as Larry Tate
  • Cynthia Black (1966) as Tabatha Stephens
  • Heidi and Laura Gentry (1966) as Tabatha Stephens
  • Tamar and Julie Young (1966) as Tabatha Stephens
  • Diane Murphy (1966–1968) as Tabatha Stephens
  • Erin Murphy (1966–1972) as Tabatha Stephens
  • Alice Pearce (1964–1966) as Gladys Kravitz
  • Sandra Gould (1966–1971) as Gladys Kravitz
  • George Tobias as Abner Kravitz
  • Irene Vernon (1964–1966) as Louise Tate
  • Kasey Rogers (1966–1972) as Louise Tate
  • Marion Lorne as Aunt Clara
  • Elizabeth Montgomery (credited as "Pandora Spocks") as Serena
Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha Stephens and Agnes Moorehead as Endora
 
Awards
  • Emmy Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy: William Asher (1966)
  • Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy: Alice Pearce (1966) (Awarded posthumously. Pearce's husband, Paul Davis, accepted the award.)
  • Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy: Marion Lorne (1968) (Awarded posthumously. Lorne died ten days before the ceremony. Elizabeth Montgomery accepted the award.)


Opening Credits

Monday, 17 September 2012

1963, News: Moscow–Washington hotline

In 1963, John F. Kennedy becomes the first U.S. president to have a direct communications line to the Kremlin in Moscow. The "hotline" was designed to facilitate communication between the president and Soviet premier.
 
The development of the hotline came in the wake of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, in which the US and USSR had come dangerously close to a nuclear war. The US had discovered that the Soviets had planted Cuban missiles capable of launching nuclear warheads. The tense diplomatic exchange that followed was highly troubled by delays caused by slow communication systems. Although Kennedy and Khrushchev were able to resolve the crisis and both signed a nuclear test-ban treaty on August 5, 1963, fears of future "misunderstandings" led to the installation of an improved communications system.
U.S. Ambassador Charles C. Stelle and Soviet negotiator Semyon K. Tsarapkin
sign the U.S.-Soviet agreement in Geneva, Switzerland on a hot line between
Washington and Moscow (06/06/1963).
On August 30, the White House issued a statement that the new hotline would "help reduce the risk of war occurring by accident or miscalculation." Instead of relying on telegrammed letters that had to travel overseas, the new technology was a momentous step toward the very near future when American and Soviet leaders could simply pick up the phone and be instantly connected 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It was agreed that the line would be used only in emergencies, not for more routine governmental exchanges.
John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev
An article in The New York Times described how the new system would work: Kennedy would relay a message to the Pentagon via phone, which would be immediately typed into a teletype machine by operators at the Pentagon, encrypted and fed into a transmitter. The message could reach the Kremlin within minutes, as opposed to hours. Although a far cry from the instantaneous communication made possible by today's cell phones and email, the technology implemented in 1963 was considered revolutionary and much more reliable and less prone to interception than a regular trans-Atlantic phone call, which had to be bounced between several countries before it reached the Kremlin.
Hotline hardware
The hotline was also known to the general public as the "red telephone" although there was never a direct connection by phone. It was considered by both superpowers but there were strong arguments against using a telephone connection. All parties concerned preferred a teletype link.

Thursday, 13 September 2012

1962, Film: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

“What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” was released on October 31, 1962. The American film is a psychological thriller produced and directed by Robert Aldrich. The screenplay by Lukas Heller is based on the novel of the same name by Henry Farrell. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one for Best Costume Design, Black and White. The main stars are Bette Davis and Joan Crawford.
 
Synopsis:
Two aging film actresses live as virtual recluses in an old Hollywood mansion. Jane Hudson (Bette Davis), a successful child star, cares for her crippled sister Blanche (Joan Crawford), who's career in later years eclipsed that of Jane. Now the two live together, their relationship affected by simmering subconscious thoughts of mutual envy, hate and revenge...
Joan Crawford & Bette Davis
Main Cast:
  • Joan Crawford as Blanche Hudson
  • Bette Davis as Jane Hudson
  • Victor Buono as Edwin Flagg
  • Maidie Norman as Elvira Stitt
  • Anna Lee as Mrs. Bates
  • B.D. Merrill as Liza Bates
  • Marjorie Bennett as Dehlia Flagg
  • Dave Willock as Ray Hudson
Joan Crawford & Bette Davis
Left: Bette Davis as Jane Hudson and Julie Allred as young Jane
Right: Joan Crawford as Blanche Hudson and Gina Gillespie as young Blanche
 
Awards:
Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Black-and-White: Norma Koch (1963)
Golden Laurel for Sleeper of the Year (1963)


Trailer

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

1961, Cars: Citroën Ami 6

The Citroën Ami 6 was introduced at the Paris Salon in October 1960. It was launched in April 1961. Citroën was responding to a market need for a vehicle larger and less basic than the 2CV but smaller than the upmarket ID/DS. The Ami 6 was a re-bodied 2CV with a larger engine 602 cc air cooled two-cylinder engine which was also offered at extra cost in the 2CV from 1961.
 
The Ami 6 was one of the first (together with the 1961 Ford Taunus) vehicles fitted with rectangular (as opposed to round) headlamps. The first model is distinguished by an unusual reverse-raked rear window, similar to the rear screen fitted to the 1959 Ford Anglia 105E. The bonnet design had a  'aesthetically challenged' dip.
Citroën Ami 6 Berline
Citroën Ami 6 Berline
Citroën Ami 6 Berline
Citroën Ami 6 Berline Club
Citroën Ami 6 Break
 
A Break version was launched in September 1964, it looked less unconventional than the Berline and was also used as the basis for the Service van in 1965. The Ami 6 was replaced by the Ami 8 in 1969. Production of the Ami 6 (Berline/Break/Service van) totalled 1,039,384 units.
Citroën Ami 8 Berline

Citroën Ami 6 Advertisment
 

Sunday, 9 September 2012

1960, Film: The King of Hollywood Dies

Clark Gable, born on February 1, 1901 in Cadiz, Ohio, died on November 16, 1960 in Los Angeles, at the age of 59. Gable died at the Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital in Los Angeles from a coronary thrombosis ten days after suffering a severe heart attack.
 
On Saturday November 5th Gable played around his ranch with his stepchildren and his hunting dog. Later that day he decided to change a tire on his Jeep. As he bent down to remove it from the vehicle, he suffered almost unbearable chest pains. When the pains subsided, he staggered into the house where his wife Kay Williams, suggested Clark to take an early supper and go to bed. He did, only to awake later with a splitting headache and what he believed to be indigestion. Kay gave him some seltzer and an aspirin. He slept uneasily until 7:15 the next morning, Sunday November 6th.
Clark Gable with first wife Josephine Dillon
When he awoke and tried to dress himself he collapsed, the vicious pain had returned. This time he knew things were very serious. Kay called his doctor then the Encino fire department for some emergency oxygen.
 
While he waited for the ambulance Gable indicated that he didn’t want his three months pregnant wife to upset herself over him. But she rode with him anyway in the ambulance to the Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital. Tests conducted there confirmed Gable had had a coronary. He was given sedatives and anticoagulants and was observed by 24-hour nursing staff. His wife took a bed in an adjoining room.
Clark Gable with second wife Maria "Ria" Franklin Prentiss Lucas Langham
Extraordinarily in the following ten days Gable appeared to be recovering. On the night of Friday November 16th at 10-50pm Clark Gable was still leafing through a magazine article when he laid his head back on his pillow and slipped away.
Clark Gable with third wife Carole Lombard
All the years of crash dieting, drinking, daily smoking of three packs and a dozen cigars had finally caught up with him. There were speculations that Gable's physically demanding role in “The Misfits” contributed to his sudden death soon after filming was completed. The long waiting hours, the stunts and the crash diet he followed were some of the rumours.
Clark Gable with fourth wife Sylvia Ashley
On Saturday November 20th Clark Gable’s private service was attended by 200 mourners in the Church of the Recessional in Forest Lawn Memorial Park. Among the mourners were Spencer Tracy, James Stewart, Robert Taylor, Norma Shearer, Ann Sothern and Marion Davies, Frank Capra, Robert Stack, Jack Oakie, Roy and Dale Rogers, Van Johnson, and Howard Strickling. He was interred in the Sanctuary of Trust alongside the crypt of his third wife, Carole Lombard who had died in a 1942 air crash.
Clar Gable with fifth wife Kay Williams
Gable was most famous for his role as Rhett Butler in the 1939 film “Gone with the Wind”, in which he starred with Vivien Leigh. His performance earned him his third nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actor; he won for “It Happened One Night” (1934) and was also nominated for “Mutiny on the Bounty” (1935). Later films included “Run Silent, Run Deep” (1958), and his final film, “The Misfits” (1961), which paired Gable with Marilyn Monroe, also in her last screen appearance.
Clark Gable with Vivien Leigh in “Gone with the Wind” (1939)
Clark Gable was married 5 times:
  • Josephine Dillon (1924–1930; divorced)
  • Maria Franklin Prentiss Lucas Langham (1931–1939; divorced)
  • Carole Lombard (1939–1942; her death)
  • Sylvia Ashley (1949–1952; divorced)
  • Kay Williams (1955–1960; his death)
Clark Gable with Marilyn Monroe in “The Misfits” (1960)
He had 2 children:
  • Judy Lewis (November 6, 1935 - November 25, 2011, affair with Loretta Young)
  • John Gable (born March 20, 1961, four months after Gable's death, with 5th wife Kay Williams)

Wednesday, 5 September 2012

1977, Music: Eurovision Song Contest

The 22nd Eurovision Song Contest was held on 7 May 1977 at the Wembley Conference Centre London, United Kingdom.Angela Rippon presented the festival and of the 18 participants Marie Myriam won for France with "L'oiseau et l'enfant" (The Bird and the Child). It was France's fifth victory.
 
The native language rule was brought back to the contest, four years after it had been dropped in 1973. However Germany and Belgium were allowed to sing in English, because they had already chosen the songs they were going to perform before the rule was reintroduced.
First Place: Marie Myriam with "L'oiseau et l'enfant" for France
Second Place: Lynsey De Paul and Mike Moran with "Rock Bottom" for The United Kingdom.
Draw
Country
Artist
Song
Place
Points
01
Ireland
The Swarbriggs Plus Two
"It's Nice to Be in Love Again"
3
119
02
Monaco
Michèle Torr
"Une petite française"
4
96
03
Netherlands
Heddy Lester
"De mallemolen"
12
35
04
Austria
Schmetterlinge
"Boom Boom Boomerang"
17
11
05
Norway
Anita Skorgan
"Casanova"
15
18
06
Germany
Silver Convention
"Telegram"
8
55
07
Luxembourg
Anne-Marie B
"Frère Jacques"
16
17
08
Portugal
Os Amigos
"Portugal no coração"
14
18
09
United Kingdom
Lynsey De Paul and Mike Moran
"Rock Bottom"
2
121
10
Greece
Paschalis, Marianna, Robert & Bessy
"Mathima Solfege"
5
92
11
Israel
Ilanit
"Ahava Hi Shir Lishnayim"
11
49
12
Switzerland
Pepe Lienhard Band
"Swiss Lady"
6
71
13
Sweden
Forbes
"Beatles"
18
2
14
Spain
Micky
"Enséñame a cantar"
9
52
15
Italy
Mia Martini
"Libera"
13
33
16
Finland
Monica Aspelund
"Lapponia"
10
50
17
Belgium
Dream Express
"A Million in One, Two, Three"
7
69
18
France
Marie Myriam
"L'oiseau et l'enfant"
1
136


Video: Marie Myriam with "L'oiseau et l'enfant"